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Old 01-11-14, 10:24 AM   #1
senkosam
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Default A theory why bass bite lures

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The hunting n stalking part is where I've had fish pull in behind a bait and follow from far away.
I try to arrive at a theory based on videos I've watched and from a hypothesis that includes asking a question, supplying relevant facts and then coming to a conclusion. If the facts are flawed or incomplete, the conclusion may be true even though the facts are flawed. Any logical hypothesis starts with wondering and hopefully, an educated guess. :-*

Not to disagree that bass stalk or hunt, but I wonder if that is in their nature? Catfish follow a scent trail and that would come as close to the definition of hunting or tracking underwater that I can think of. From my perspective, the sequence of following and focusing on a lure starts with the lure suddenly entering a bass's space or area of attack. Once you've got its attention, it is unable to break off and return to empty contemplation and must focus on the object, almost as if hypnotized. For that to happen the lure must act a certain way (presentation) and look and move a certain way (appearance and innate lure action).

I've watched the video Big Mouth and others by Glen Lau and have noted that smaller fish tend to chase lures whereas larger bass chose to strike slower moving lures, given enough time to observe them, and then locking in the target for the attack sequence.

When I was a kid, I enjoyed watching my cat observe a mouse on a string or the real thing it had injured. It would stay motionless for a good while as I slid the mouse a few inches at a time with pauses. I could tell that it was in the mood to track-and-attack that mouse simulation. Finally I started moving the mouse faster beyond a certain acceptable distance and the cat pounced. (I believe a bass may instinctively know a lure is not an imitation, but is nonetheless curious and annoyed not knowing what it is!)

The above sequence so reminds me of those underwater videos, and granted, a bass doesn't have the brain of a cat, but it tracks-to-attack within a short distance, kind of like locking a missile on to certain coordinates. Beyond that distance, it loses interest and its brain shuts off.

Reflex strikes I'm not sure are ambushes in the strictest sense as it pertains to a hunter in a blind. Ambushes involve hiding in order to attack. IMO bass don't hide from anything; if in danger, it flees. If something plummets near its resting spot and that lure's action and speed is just right to evoke an instant targeting-attack sequence, then the bass can't help itself, as in any targeting-attack impulse that may take longer for a response, whether the target is a live immobile animal or a finesse bait.

If the bass attacks from cover, its interest and focus starts with the lure's splash. It tracks lure vibrations as we would a train whistle coming toward us from around a bend at night. Once close enough, it attacks by impulse and not from hunger or a feeding frenzy. That sequence may define an ambush, but for a reason different than conventional theory insists on.

Conventional theory insists that a bass hides in wait and when a lure comes near, believing it is an animal it normally eats, pounces because the meal is easy to catch and put in its mouth. That could be right, but when discussing the behavior of a pea brained animal where instincts dominate its behavior versus thought its not capable of (which I truly believe), than simplifying bass behavior as it concerns artificial lures seems more logical, though less imaginative.

As far a hitting larger versus smaller swimbaits, aggression/ nervous levels vary and the higher the level (most certain in spring), the more apt to strike a wider range of sizes. As aggression levels decline, slower-and-smaller may be necessary to impel a bass to strike.

None of the above is or can be for certain, not even conventional ideas that involve a human's imagination to excite human minds as to why lures are bit. By imparting complex neural abilities to bass that their feeble brains are incapable of suggests that man is the mighty hunter of an animal that doesn't even know enough to avoid a heron's or cormorant's beak!
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Old 01-13-14, 10:35 PM   #2
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I'm not certain if your post wanted or needed a reply. I have witnessed bass pushing a wake 20+ feet in shallow water to meet a cast frog to intercept it the moment it hit the water. Even though I am well aware that bass are low level thinkers operating on nothing more than basic survival instincts I still find it entertaining and harmless to attribute human-like emotions and motives to their behavior. It was fun when I was a kid with a cane pole and it's still fun today.
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Old 01-13-14, 10:58 PM   #3
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I still find it entertaining and harmless to attribute human-like emotions and motives to their behavior.
The best reply I could have hoped for! I just went into more detail offering some thinking outside the box beyond conventional theories about bass behavior to make anglers wonder if what you and I said could be true, though led to believe just the opposite by the many self-made authorities since we were old enough to hold a fishing rod.

And you're right, if someone believes a pink skirted jig represents a crawfish to a bass, what's the harm? If they can catch fish on it, who's to say otherwise?
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Old 01-14-14, 08:29 AM   #4
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Pink in the pads and under bridges,theory is a pink frog resembles a newborn cliff swallow out of the nest,dunno just know it works and have little competition due to how weird it is and or looks=ps stripers will inhale as well.While they must eat,the reasons for striking any bait are many and varied,possibly don't want it to reproduce,its an invader-territorial,you OR IT HAS IT POED,it just had a bad day and it happened along ,not to mention competition toss a bone in with a pack of dogs they all go for it be it small or large with meat or no meat on it,the one that gets it cares that it got to it first not that it was the best bone.MEANING THAT JARRING STRIKE OFTEN MEANS IT HAD COMPANY.Also why you catch the runt of a pack at times,being smaller they move faster so being second does mean sometimes they try harder.Ive had small fish try to eat one finger if stuck in the water off say a dock,good thing no pirhanna here.

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Old 01-15-14, 12:02 PM   #5
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Quote:
Pink in the pads and under bridges,theory is a pink frog resembles a newborn cliff swallow out of the nest,dunno just know it works and have little competition due to how weird it is and or look
Instead, maybe bass are alien creatures (to us) that strike alien creatures that trespass into their territory - simple as that. To assign reasons why any predator species eats our lures is a nice topic for bull sessions, but I have to believe is nothing but guessing/ speculation that can't be proven beyond a doubt, even by those who consider themselves authorities (not you, of course.) Lure choice based on unproven assumptions may work some of the time, but proves nothing most of the time and every experienced angler knows that.

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Old 01-15-14, 02:00 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by kennethdaysale View Post
I'm not certain if your post wanted or needed a reply. I have witnessed bass pushing a wake 20+ feet in shallow water to meet a cast frog to intercept it the moment it hit the water. Even though I am well aware that bass are low level thinkers operating on nothing more than basic survival instincts I still find it entertaining and harmless to attribute human-like emotions and motives to their behavior. It was fun when I was a kid with a cane pole and it's still fun today.

It is called Anthropomorphism, we do it all the time when fishing without even thinking about it.
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Old 01-16-14, 11:12 PM   #7
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If someone throws me a pizza I will eat it because I love pizza. If someone throws me a piece of fruitcake I'll ignore it because I don't like fruit cake. A bass will swallow a worm because it has tasted it before and liked it. Throw the same bass a toad and it will either spit it out or ignore it because it has a bad taste. To me this is normal. Would I eat the fruit cake if I was starving? Yes I would. Would a bass eat a toad if it was starving? I don't know. To me this is also normal. The bass and I have both tasted those items and have drawn a conclusion to what we eat normally. The only difference I see is that a bass might strike something that looks like food if he can't see it. To me this is just a simple theory and bass are also inclined to strike because of other factors. We all know those to be protecting their beds, becoming mad at something, not wanting another fish to get it before they do. So I feel that a bass will strike first because it is hungry and knows what it likes to eat and if presented that it will eat.Second I feel that reaction is a strong point to eating something also. So in reading your observations I tend to agree somewhat but I feel hunger is the number one motivating reason a bass strikes a lure when it closely resembles something they are familiar to.
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Old 01-16-14, 11:39 PM   #8
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Hate to put a damper on the logic of your statements such as:
Quote:
A bass will swallow a worm because it has tasted it before and liked it.
(How many bass have ever had the opportunity of seeing much less eating an earthworm?)

Quote:
becoming mad at something, not wanting another fish to get it before they do. (competitiveness)
(Ever hear of the word anthropomorphism? When humans assign human traits, such as emotions and human motivations to animals, it's commonly called that word.)

The following is something I came up with that I needed the right words to express it. It is only a theory, but one that makes sense after looking back over 50 years of fishing for many species of fish.(Having taken biology and zoology courses haven't hurt.) So consider this as a possible theory why and what bass strike:

1. Bass are predators with sensitive innate abilities. (lateral line, ear, smell, bi-directional eye sight.

2. Like all animals, bass respond to different stimuli in different ways: sudden object appearance, noise/vibration, visual cues regarding size, shadowing, object brightness and hue, all within a changing environment of light, temperature, cover changes and depth

When a fish strikes your Shad Rap, other things matter, which always matter to an experienced bass angler: lure speed, size, depth, action, hook size and lastly, but not less important - color. An angler will consider those lure characteristics beyond what species he may think the lure may represent to a fish, but few of those (except maybe shape, size and color) have anything to do with species imitation but more to do with vibration and light under water and how lures move.

Granted, many times bass are cued in to a prey type such as other fish that are in a school or they are hunting crawfish near rocks, but what bass share with all animals is that they are stimulated by stimuli regardless the type. The stimulus might provoke a response or not (even easy prey are ignored more often than not and some prey - like certain toad species - are rejected).

When someone suggests a blade size change on a spinnerbait, a prey species is not even considered because lure vibration, flash, lure speed are the prime considerations, along with how the change fits in with certain presentation such as slow-roll, bottom hopping, a fast retrieve, waking the surface, greater or lesser skirt/trailer pulsation, etc. What the lure does and can do is at the top of the list for making lure choices.

Make a surface commotion with a surface lure and watch a bass change its lazy attitude regardless of what it may think it is. (and considering the fact that a fish doesn't have the ability of analytical thought.)

Worm rigs? At least eight I can think of that have more to do with lure action and speed than anything a worm may represent (and doesn't when you consider many plastic worms' actions and appearances).

Better built and designed crankbaits are chosen for their action most of all; what they may look like is secondary if multiple colors and designs can be used to catch fish within the same time period.

Jig types vary as do trailers, both having to do with presentation and lure action rather than whether bass are eating crawfish. (Some have suggested the skirted jig can represent a prey fish when worked the right way and in the right color. - yea right!)

Even various line types affect lure action and presentations and are higher on the list than type of prey one may think a bass is eating, prefers, loves or has its heart set on.

Therefore, the type of stimulus (noise, flash, subtle lure action, object speed, etc) anglers use is as if not more important than any basic reason bass strike lures such as hunger. To believe that hunger based opportunism is the prime reason is fine, as is believing bass have emotional responses to lures or prey, but when an angler chooses lures, he or she is thinking about lure factors that can make a difference, little of which has anything to do with prey species or type. Most important is to get the lure close enough, worked the right way and let everything else about it do the rest.

Fishing can be difficult enough without adding other things that have never been proven when it comes to lure choice, but that are easily proven when it comes to the lure, the line and the presentation in the right hands.

Just a thought on a gray winter's day.

Last edited by senkosam; 01-17-14 at 12:19 AM.
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Old 01-18-14, 11:31 AM   #9
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There are times blade size,flash and or speed mimic they actual prey they are after that particular day,at times here butter bean shad are on the menu or even fathead minnows toss a large A plug no hits toss a shadrap and or pointer 1.5 bingo.Bottom line for me is if with another and their bait is out producing mine I switch,would be nice to know why BUT if we caught them all be called catching not fishing.My biggest problem this past year was not in getting bit but actually getting them in the boat.
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Old 01-23-14, 02:14 PM   #10
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I do not bite the imitation of living prey theory with completely unnatural motion, I know how a dying fish moves, Iīve had tropical fish since I was five and seen hundreds of my fish die; with a lot of baits I can imitate that motion, but one thing I have never seen in 45 years of fishkeeping is a dying fish rotating along itīs longitudinal axis like a spinnerbait blade does; the "match the hatch" theory has got a lot of holes, so letīs put it aside, the truest statemenst in this discussion are:



1. Bass are predators with sensitive innate abilities. (lateral line, ear, smell, bi-directional eye sight.

2. Like all animals, bass respond to different stimuli in different ways


You want to belive in that theory of imitation ? ----> good for you, anything that you believe that makes you feel confident is excellent.

Why a fish bites has a lot reasons behind of the actual bite, the fish may be attracted by the sound, the motion, the vibration, etc; but one thing is for shure, they have no hands and the only way they can explore the lure is by biting it.

A lesson I learned many years ago took place in a small pond a few miles from my home, the pond is used as a reservoir for the irrigation system after the water has been extracted by the well pump, the water is crystal clear because of the high turnover rate, I liked the place and literally fished it four or five times a week, I caught the fish and released them again and again, lots of dinks but one day things were different, I made a cast with a crank I modified to be a suspending medium diver, started reeling in when I saw a big momma come out of the cattails heading to my crank really fast, my concern was that ..... I was running out of pond ! , well it happened what was going to happen, I ran out of pond, the fish stopped right at the pond Wall when my bait ceased to move, darn ! what to do ? , neither the fish nor the bait were going anywhere cuz there was no pond left so I pulled the bait out of the water, the fish went away back into itīs grotto, dang ! a lost opportunity to catch me a bigun . I made another cast and guess what ? here she comes again ! and the same thing happened, I ran out of pond again !

The bait had the right action to attract her, only problem was she didnīt have enough room to perform the attack and there was no way for me to present the bait from another location, it was that way or no way, and what if ? .........

I made another cast and here she comes, we ran out of pond but this time I was ready, the bait suspended, so I dangled the bait on her face, interested but not commited she moves a couple of inches closer, another twitch to the rod , she moves a couple of inches closer, interested but not quite convinced, a few more twitches, a few more inches closer, my bait was imitating an action Iīve seen in my fish: the fish picking food from the stuff inside the tank worry free, after a few minutes she was maybe an inch from the bait, I almost had her but it ainīt over till the fat lady dances, if the water wasnīt so clear I would have missed that fish, in a fraction of a second she inhaled the crank, in that fraction of a second I saw her inhale the bait and in that fraction of a second I raised my rod and as she spitted the lure I hooked her by the lower lip. I ended up fighting her and finally lipped it, she weighted almost 9 lbs.

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Old 01-23-14, 02:54 PM   #11
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...so after the nice anecdote, what conclusion did you come to why bass or any predator fish bites artificial lures? When it comes to live bait, seeing is believing, but artificial lures don't come close to replicating anything exactly that a bass instinctively knows/feels is real.

In my case of visually seeing a strike, I own a semi-clear pond I stocked with pan fish and bass (by permit). The weed edge forms a 3' wide, 3' deep, 10' long lane parallel to the water's edge. I was playing with a small drop shot bait and rig and caught yellow perch and a sunfish. A bass that was in the weeds, came out of nowhere and got caught on the same bait it saw the pan fish get taken on.

Conclusion: fish are dumb as a rock and prone to being provoked. End of story.
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Old 01-23-14, 10:52 PM   #12
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what conclusion did you come to why bass or any predator fish bites artificial lures?

Sam I'm not sure if you're proposing a conclusion of your own or not......if you are I'm having a little trouble figuring out what it is. Most likely just pondering the same questions we've all been asking ourselves ever since we realized fishing was our "thing". I'm 57 and have been devoted to learning everything I possibly can for well over 40 years. Every time I think I have a question answered.....a glaring exception raises more questions. I've finally become comfortable with the conclusion that "dumb as a rock" as they may be they are still living, surviving and thriving in a primal aquatic world that I will never truly understand. And I like it!
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Old 01-24-14, 07:35 AM   #13
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The question was directed at Raul. I wasn't sure what he thought the reason fish bite lures with the statement,
Quote:
I do not bite the imitation of living prey theory with completely unnatural motion, I know how a dying fish moves,...
and the anecdote after.

My large number of examples in my mind and experience attempts to refute the match the hatch reason for lure choices with more emphasis on lure action and presentation [my conclusion]. Controlled experiments are what we do every time we cast and retrieve an artificial lure made of material that mimics nothing that lives. Animals can be provoked into attacking objects, some more so than others at any given time, as well as different shapes, actions and colors at the same time, witnessed many times fishing with a partner.

Unlock one or more lure features needed to provoke a strike and the rest will follow. The choice of features is large at times but limited at others, exemplified by seasonal lure choice differences - obvious with diminished lure speed, action and size critical in cooler water, with the same factors increased as water temperature rises.

There are a few lures that work all year round as long as speed and size are considered. Matching a prey animal may be coincidental if a lure works, but in my opinion never a reason to pick certain lures that should be chosen mostly for environmental and fish activity considerations.

Last edited by senkosam; 01-24-14 at 08:27 AM.
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Old 01-24-14, 09:17 AM   #14
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A few weeks ago, I was fishing with a friend. I was catching bass like crazy, using a silver/black back 2" Husky Jerk.
My friend had the same size Husky Jerk, but in baby bass color. After getting skunked for an hour, he finally tied it on.
Didn't matter, the bass were still hammering my lure, and he was getting nothing.

Just to prove the point, we traded lures. I kept fishing my way, he fished his way, but now he had my lure and I had his, and he started catching fish. We did this for about another hour, until I tied on another silver/black back that I had.

We started hooking up double catches and continued catching fish for the rest of the day. We both tried soft plastics and other cranks, but nothing produced like the silver/black back Husky Jerk.

Finally, one of the larger boated bass regurgitated some minnows. They were almost identical to my lure. I know it doesn't work this way everytime, but on this day, those bass were definitely going for a "hatch" ... and nothing else was "looking" good.
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Old 01-24-14, 10:47 AM   #15
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Same thing happened to me: my partner was using a Houdini paddle tail shad on a weighted hook; I was using my usual Zoom Fluke, nose hooked using an Octopus hook. He caught bass to the side of a hump over deeper water; I caught nothing until I changed to the lure he was using that had an entirely different action. This scenario has repeated itself time after time and on different waters and structure.

Similar lures but different enough to make a difference. He used a Lake Fork Frog and caught fish in shallow pads; I used another brand with a different action; he got bass to strike, mine wouldn't get a whiff.

BTW both jerk flukes were pearl colored.
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Old 01-24-14, 11:10 AM   #16
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Default posted by kennethdaysale

Here's my take on why bass bite lures and the whole "match the hatch" deal. Once a bass gets 6+ months old the OVERWHELMING majority of what it eats are baitfish............PERIOD! Even though highly effective lures like spinnerbaits and buzzbaits might not look much like baitfish when we see them in the palm of our hand you can rest assured that when a bass sees them in the water that's what he sees.If bass eat our lures simply based on action-size-color-depth etc with no "consideration" whatsoever to it's baitfish resemblance, then we could easily catch them with any of the following items that could be fitted with line ties and hooks or just impaled like a worm. Please note that depending on the particular item they could easily be twitched, hopped, painted, jerked, swam, cranked, popped, deadsticked, suspended.....................1. Stapler2. Fingernail clippers3. Pocket comb4. a Greenbean5. Dental Retainer6. Rosary Beads7. Nipple Ring8. Thimble9. Bowtie10. Fork11. small Loofa12. Twizzler13. Condom14. Chapstick15. 8 Penny nail16. Bobbin17. Celery stalk18. Tampon19. Hearing Aide20. Valve stem21. Compact Disc22. Debit Card23. Linguine24. Toothbrush25. Vienna26. Emeryboardetc etc etcSoooooo since none of these "artificial" items are likely tied on any of our rods, they are no less "artificial" than any lure in our tacklebox. So I will not give credit to bass for complex neural abilities and concede that they are often not smart enough to avoid being harpooned by a heron. I still want to show them something "believable".
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Old 01-24-14, 11:15 AM   #17
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Sam thanks for posting that for me in the nanosecond between the time I posted it and the moment I realized my phone crammed it all into one big paragraph instead of the much more organized way I laid it out before deleting it and going to the desktop upstairs to repost
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Old 01-24-14, 11:21 AM   #18
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For some reason Kenneth's reply didn't show so I posted it for him.

My reply:
Let me clarify. I do believe that a few lures resemble and may be taken by bass to represent a general prey category: fish, craw, insect. And I believe the appeal may come from something in a bass's DNA and brain that associates lure form and action with an animal type. That's as far as I'll go when it comes to matching a prey animal. In fact, I pour a soft plastic minnow that exactly mimics the action of a minnow and catches fish on many colors regardless the time of day or year or the water.

Another lure that closely replicates a minnow's action is Rapala's Original Floating Minnow. Only a few soft plastic frogs copy the action of the real thing and I believe the lures appeal is in part because of the action.

But even though those lures may provoke based on similarities to a real animal, other factors are as important or more important : the combination of action, vibration, color, size and speed, with finesse action being at the top of the list most times of year when bass aren't active regardless of season.

As far as using certain colors to match a certain fish species we can only guess bass are focused on eating: 1. it's not often a bass regurgitates food, especially if released immediately, 2. none of us would cut a fish's belly open to see what it's been eating and 3. no one has a scuba diver near when they need one to tell us where bass are biting and which lures to use that match what he just saw a fish eat. Guessing and then assuming proves nothing if the experiment is only done once or a few times on the same day.

So many articles in BassMaster magazine quote pros saying, "I switched to a sunfish pattern colored jig and trailer" or used a "fall colored crawfish over a summer colored crawfish, and caught big fish immediately". Nonsense and fodder for simpletons IMO!

Last edited by senkosam; 01-24-14 at 11:33 AM.
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Old 01-24-14, 11:49 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by senkosam View Post
For some reason Kenneth's reply didn't show so I posted it for him.

My reply:
Let me clarify. I do believe that a few lures resemble and may be taken by bass to represent a general prey category: fish, craw, insect.

So many articles in BassMaster magazine quote pros saying, "I switched to a sunfish pattern colored jig and trailer" or used a "fall colored crawfish over a summer colored crawfish, and caught big fish immediately". Nonsense and fodder for simpletons IMO.
I think I understand your point but on the other hand if a pro says a color change helped him out I think it a big stretch to call that nonsense or imply that a fisherman that changes colors and finds success is a simpleton.

Here's the post in a more readable form:

Here's my take on why bass bite lures and the whole "match the hatch" deal. Once a bass gets 6 months old the OVERWHELMNG majority of what it eats are baitfish.........PERIOD! Even though highly effective lures like spinnerbaits and buzzbaits might not look much like baitfish when we see them in the palm of our hand you can rest assured that when a bass sees them in the water that's what he sees.

If bass eat our lures simply based on action-size-color-depth etc with no "consideration" whatsoever to it's baitfish resemblance, then we could easily catch them with any of the following items that could be fitted with line ties and hooks or just impaled like a worm. Please note that depending on the particular item they could easily be twitched, hopped, painted, jerked, swam, cranked, popped, deadsticked, suspended.............

1. Stapler
2. Fingernail Clippers
3. Pocket Comb
4. a Greenbean
5. Dental Retainer
6. Rosary Beads
7. Nipple Ring
8. Thimble
9. Bowtie
10. Fork
11. small Loofa
12. Twizzler
13. Condom
14. Chapstick
15. 8 Penny nail
16. Bobbin
17. Celery stalk
18. Tampon
19. Hearing Aide
20. Valve stem
21. Compact Disc
22. Debit Card
23. Linguine
24. Toothbrush
25. Vienna
26. Emoryboard

Sooooooo since none of these "artificial" items are likely tied on any of our rods they are no less "artificial" than any lure in our tacklebox. So I will not give credit to bass for complex neural abilities and concede that they are often not smart enough to to avoid being harpooned by a heron. I still want to show them some thing "believable".
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Old 01-24-14, 01:48 PM   #20
senkosam
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Sorry, I should have said, lure choice based on a certain species of prey fish is simplistic IMO, especially when a pro states categorically that the reason the lure worked was because of it. Color change in itself may be important but not for the reason implied (recognition = increased strike potential).

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So I will not give credit to bass for complex neural abilities and concede that they are often not smart enough to to avoid being harpooned by a heron. I still want to show them some thing "believable".
"believable" is a bit vague but similar in action to a life form, but not a specific species of fish by color (fat head minnow, shad, sunfish, yellow perch, white perch, etc), nails it for me. The life form simulation most thought to get more strikes varies depending on who you talk to, even though fish are the main item fed upon. I know of anglers who predominantly use bottom worked soft plastics and jigs 90% of the time and others who prefer crankbaits. Both catch fish in areas of a lake that those lures work. So even if fish do eat more fish than any other prey animal doesn't mean bass always prefer lures that simulate them. In fact, sometimes simple abstractions of life (the flash of a shad, the dart of a minnow, the minimal flex of a soft stick) without the lure looking like anything in nature, may convince (?) a fish to strike, but more simply stated, it provokes the strike, like getting a bull to charge a cap.

Given a choice of 5 lures of similar design, having similar action and in similar colors, one outperforms the others regardless of who casts it. Why, is what I want to know! When using a crankbait for example, was it the bill shape or size, rattle chamber, no rattles, hook size, plug width, color brightness that caused that lure to excel at that particular day or week? or was it a combination of those factors unique to that lure?

Believable depends on the brain processing the information and I won't ever have an inkling of what a bass believes or thinks! I leave that to the gurus selling fishing tackle.

Last edited by senkosam; 01-24-14 at 02:10 PM.
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Old 01-24-14, 05:00 PM   #21
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Why, is what I want to know!
Only the fish (bass) knows the answer and in the interest of self-preservation, it's not going to tell you.
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Old 01-24-14, 05:20 PM   #22
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Good one!!
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