Bass Fishing HomeBass Fishing Forums

Go Back   BassFishin.Com Forums > Serious Conversation Only > Techniques, Strategy & Presentations

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 12-27-04, 10:27 AM   #1
Slayem9
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to Slayem9
Default Are handpoured baits always superior?

Are handpoured baits always superior to mass produced soft plastics?

My take, after participating in a swap on tackleunderground, is that it depends.

Sam
Slayem9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-04, 10:42 AM   #2
macgyver
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to macgyver
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

[quote author=senkosam link=board=news;num=1104154054;start=0#0 date=12/27/04 at 08:27:34]Are handpoured baits always superior to mass produced soft plastics?

My take, after participating in a swap on tackleunderground, is that it depends.

Sam[/quote]


Well we will have to agree again To me it dpends more on the plastics visual appearance, sometimes non-mass produced can make a different look/appeal, not given by the Big Companies. Sometimes the Big companies can produce for a better price, with a more consistant basis, a look or feel. I like both depending on what you get. Some folks think that Hand Poured are the greatest, some think they're baloney. I like both depending on looks/feel/durability/color/drop rate/ etc...


Lizards
macgyver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-04, 11:30 AM   #3
Slayem9
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to Slayem9
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

LR, as usual, we are completely sympatico.

Here's a few thoughts and considerations.

Some are, some aren't!
The basics must be observed for various soft plastic lures, or the results will just be another hunk of plastic that the angler will not develop confidence in, and that catch few or no fish.

For example, softness must be proper; a plastic that is too hard will not help a fish retain the bite and the lure will lose most of it's action.

Too much softness is evident in Senkos - one lure/one fish. A lure can be soft yet resilient.

A curl or sickle tail must be thin. A wide tail (Kalin style) is a design preference; thinness is an action necessity.

Few baits require salt, but those that do (Senko types), must have the right percentage of salt and the right amount of softener added for the best action. Salt stiffens a bait and plastisol with too much hardener, makes the lure actionless on the drop. Salt can make thin parts fragile, unless the right amount is used.

Too much dye or glitter, affects appearence as far as light reflectivity and translucence. A little goes a long way!

These are a few quality control issues not addressed by many that sell on-line and I don't understand how they keep selling lures. But many handpourers make a unique product that can be customized to customer specs or that are not available commercially due to unique design properties.

Certain pros have their soft plastics made special and I'm sure insist that those specs remain classified. These lures aren't cheap.

What justifies a high unit price for a good handpour?
1. Time - mass produced lures are mostly injection poured and the molds and automation cost thousands of dollars for one size in one design. For a handpoured lure, each is poured one at a time, slowly, to prevent air bubbles and avoid too much or too little plastic that could effect action or appearence.

2. Softness is a supreme quality coupled with just the right amount of durablity or hardness. This means changing the bait less and less placement to the front of a hook or jig.

3. Salt affects fall rate and castablity without added weight. Are Senkos superior in part because a finicky or older fish doesn't have to taste lead, when it inhales a soft plastic lure or is it just the faster horizontal fall? *Regardless, salt percentage is an important variable that affects drop rate and allows the use of a lighter sinker or jig.

4. There is a degree of personal skill involved in handpouring quality lures versus a machine that pumps out 1,000 lures an hour. A machine can offer consistent quality and more so than many handpoured baits, but is not capable of customer customization or variation of the above variables.
(I once asked Mr. Twister to consider a certain color combo that Kalin produced in their grubs, as well as a small curl tail. Mr.Twister never responded.)

5. The cost factor for an individual is much higher versus the cost factor and higher profit margin of a manufacturer. A large company buys materials by the ton and saves on unit costs. The small timer pays much more per unit cost (i.e. $/oz. or pound and per gallon). A large company like Yamamoto Enterprises, produces a Senko for a dime and sells it for over 200% profit to a retailer. A handpourer may only make 20% profit on materials and energy, but it's his time, innovativeness and craftmanship that are significant.

For personal use, one can save time and money on a unique product, customized to ones own exact preferences, so he will consider his product to be better or equal to a mass produced lure.

But then again, that doesn't really answer the question completely. Will a similar, mass produced bait do the job most of the time? * *I think so.

Sam
Slayem9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-04, 12:41 PM   #4
catfishtonyd
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to catfishtonyd
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

(Picture two fish on the bottom of the lake, watching a plastic worm go by.)

"Oh look. A hand poured "Worm D Mould-03". That was a very good year."
catfishtonyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-04, 06:20 PM   #5
profishermenkid16
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to profishermenkid16
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

Sam, Depends are what old people wear. Isn't it funny people start out wearing diapers when they were young only to return wearing them when they get old ? ??? Now to answer your question. Hand pours are usually better because the plastic mix is softer and contain more air bubbles than factory pours so they seem more lifelike when fished.Durability is out the window compared to factory pours but that is not a concern to me as long as they catch fish. I am thinking that you already knew all of this and was just baiting me for the depends thing.One could say it depends on the idiot doing the hand pours.I say idiot because eventually the fumes he breathes when pouring the molds will kill his brain cells off. ;D P N J
profishermenkid16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-04, 06:48 PM   #6
catfishtonyd
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to catfishtonyd
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

Sam. Years ago, when I worked part time at a local tackle shop, we called Mr. Twister to see about a special run of a popular color they had discontinued. They told us that if we ordered 10,000 worms in one size they'd make it. Needless to say that was the end of that. It's probably higher now.
catfishtonyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-04, 03:28 AM   #7
FloridaBassAssassn
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: University of Florida
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to FloridaBassAssassn
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

Sam,
The durability of soft heavy salt baits like sink-o's (and my baits too for that matter) has nothing to do with the softness of the bait but more as to the amount of salt in it. The more salt particals in a bait, the easier they tear up, but the more salt, (if you keep them soft) the more action the bait has. I could make my baits alot more durable then the are, but they would not get as many hits. I would reither get the bites and go through a few more baits then fish the same bait all day for a few bites. My lures are good for about 1 to 5 fish. *Some fish can thrash around and throw a bait off the first time and most don't as I can average about 3 fish per bait. But with some creative rigging I can get as many as 12 fish off one bait. But hey when the bait gets tore up I just put it in a pile to remelt down for me to use later.
Hey, who's baits did you think were the best in that bait swap you did on TU anyway? *

FloridaBassAssassn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-04, 09:35 AM   #8
mblk181
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to mblk181
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

One fellow on another board suggested that fish prefer the lighter lure between two identically shaped and colored lures. If this is the case, then hand pours will most likely secure the first place trophy. Being lighter does provide a gentler, more graceful fall and glide.

Now, if a wafting glide isn't the presentation most preferred in certain water conditions, such as murkiness for example, a stiffer bait when twitched or jerked will move more water more dramatically (abruptly) than a super supple and lightweight lure and the factory lures may do a little better.

Another friend fished 5 lakes in Canada for large and smallmouth this summer and found the zoom Horny
Toads to far produce all other lures they had tried. The heavy block of plastic being hauled across the top produced catches of 135 bass per person per day. Kind of a clubbing approach compared to other presentations.

Personally, I prefer the handpours presented in a slow fall approach and occasionally do very well. Just where my confidence is.....may or may not be the best choice at times...thanks for the interesting thread, and Good Fishing, Mac
mblk181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-04, 04:36 AM   #9
FloridaBassAssassn
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: University of Florida
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to FloridaBassAssassn
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

I highly disagree that lighter is better. I slower fall might sometimes work better but you don't have to make the bait lighter to achive that. Any bait that is fished without added wieght has a slower fall then one that has a hunk of lead on it. A lighter bait is just harder to cast and work. You can get a slower fall in many ways. My baits have a slower fall then your sinko type baits because they have more water resistance as the are wider and flater. I think it has a lot more to do with how much action the bait has as it falls, then the fall rate anyway. IMO That's why I designed as much action into my baits on the fall as I could get.
FloridaBassAssassn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-04, 08:43 AM   #10
Slayem9
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to Slayem9
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

Quote:
The more salt particals in a bait, the easier they tear up,
The more salt a plastic contains, the harder and heavier the lure is as long as the same amount of hardener is not offset by softener. Too much salt only effects thin action parts - not the main body. Put 40% salt in regular plastisol and the bait will fall like a rock and have the action of a rock because it has the hardness of a rock! Banjo Minnows tear easier because of the amount of softener added, not salt. Slugos are among the most durable of plastics because of hardener, not the absence of salt.

Plastisol floats, even with a thin wire hook. It will float with a thicker wire hook if microbubbles are added, (air injection or actual plastic bubbles).
Horizontal fall rate has to do with salt content and hook size; durability versus action has to do with the amount of softener added. A soft bait will tear easier and not stay up on the hook or jig.

Quote:
I highly disagree that lighter is better. I slower fall might sometimes work better but you don't have to make the bait lighter to achive that.
My jerk worms are alway lighter when used as jerk baits; I make them heavier when used as horizontal-fall baits. Medium-light is better for a mix of jerk-&-fall retrieves in shallow water or for a slower fall in weed pockets and over rock flats. Salt and hook size are the primary variables that are the easiest to control drop rates with.
Quote:
A lighter bait is just harder to cast and work.
Depends on the total weight/size and density of the plastic. The only lure that is super light and that is difficult to throw weightless, is one made of cyberflex and 3X plastic.

Any 4" stick worm will cast a mile with spinning tackle and no weight added! When it comes to soft plastics, heavier does not mean "more difficult to work". *"Wider or bulkier" has nothing to do with drop rate in two lures of the same size and shape. The weight of the plastic determines that as examplified by the fact that a 4" Slugo will cast just as easy, weightless, as a 6" Phenom worm (aerodynamics not withstanding).

Quote:
My baits have a slower fall then your sinko type baits because they have more water resistance as the are wider and flater. I think it has a lot more to do with how much action the bait has as it falls, then the fall rate anyway.
Senkos are supposed to have a faster drop rate and it's largest application is when used with no bullet weight. Of course your plastics are lighter if you use little or no salt. .2-.3 oz of add weight via salt, makes a big difference in a 5 1/4" thick worm. Your style of bait is negligble when talking about a stick worm style because it can be made heavier than Senkos.

Senkos have 5x the action of your style of baits, no action imparted, and have a faster drop rate. Action as related to fall rate only has to do with the addition of larger curl tails, head skirts (hula grub) and multiple legs. *Faster, jerk worm fall rates are dependent on salt content only and less buoyancy.

When it comes to grubs, the larger the tail and the lighter the jighead, the greater the action on a swim-retrieve and the slower the drop rate. Skirted jig fall slower with double tail trailers, than with chunk plastics that weigh more. Action tails take precedence over a lure of the same weight, when it comes to the drop or water resistance. Buoyancy is not the main factor, hydrodynamics are and hydrodynamics are what gives the Senko and other similar full rounded jerkworms, their unique action.

When handpourers relate the superior qualities of their lures, manufactured lures many times will be as good or better in certain styles. Customizing a style of lure, is like fine tuning an engine or sighting a rifle and is a customer requirement/ preference, not a universal need. People and companies can hype all they want - the proof is in the catching!

Sam


Slayem9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-04, 09:11 AM   #11
macgyver
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to macgyver
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

[quote author=Fish-N-Fool link=board=news;num=1104154054;start=0#8 date=12/29/04 at 02:36:53]I highly disagree that lighter is better. I slower fall might sometimes work better but you don't have to make the bait lighter to achive that. Any bait that is fished without added wieght has a slower fall then one that has a hunk of lead on it. A lighter bait is just harder to cast and work. You can get a slower fall in many ways. My baits have a slower fall then your sinko type baits because they have more water resistance as the are wider and flater. I think it has a lot more to do with how much action the bait has as it falls, then the fall rate anyway. IMO That's why I designed as much action into my baits on the fall as I could get.
[/quote]


That's why we all have our preferences, but most of the time I do prefer Lighter baits, with slower fall rates. Why because I prefer the different capabilities it allows me to use. For example, if I have a weightless Power worm, and throw it, the fall will be very slow, but if I add say a insert weight into the middle it will fall faster, and at a different angle, therefor producing a different action. If you have a heavier bait, then you can never really slow the fall, unless you change the profile, or add air or some other thing to help it be more bouyant, which will usally change the profile of the bait some what. I can also change the hook size itself or the placement of the hook for different looks, again with a heavy bait it will always fall faster, without any chance of slowing. I use lighter baits also, because it allows me to fish HEAVY cover with less snags, due to the ease of getting it over obstacles, the a heavier bait will get you hung up on. I can also fish Lighter baits ON TOP of vegetation, and keep it there, where a heavier bait will get caught or fall through it. I understand YOUR preference isn't going to be mine, but both application have there time and place. Your bait does somewhat resemble the stick type bait, so perhaps that's more of what you like. I prefer lighter, with more water moving capailies Like Lizards/Brush Hogs/Zipper Worms/Creature Baits. These are MY preferred plastics, and will usually only use the Stick type baits if none of these are working. And believe me I know the stick baits will catch fish, but so will mine

Lizards
macgyver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-04, 09:29 AM   #12
spinnerb8
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

My baitsMy baitsMy baitsMy baits ??? ??? ???
Ok I'm done now..I've fished Zoom lizards,Netbait lizards and Bearpaw's salamanders and my catch rate really didn't change much.I will say the attacked Bearpaw's bait harder then the other two.Again its a preference thing,
Oh and ISTILL haven't caught a fish with a stick bait.It didn't take me this long to catch one on a p-n-j ???
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-04, 06:05 PM   #13
FloridaBassAssassn
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: University of Florida
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to FloridaBassAssassn
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

Quote:
A lighter bait is just harder to cast and work. *


Depends on the total weight/size and density of the plastic. The only lure that is super light and that is difficult to throw weightless, is one made of cyberflex and 3X plastic. *

Any 4" stick worm will cast a mile with spinning tackle and no weight added! When it comes to soft plastics, heavier does not mean "more difficult to work". *"Wider or bulkier" has nothing to do with drop rate - the weight of the plastic determines that. *

I don't want to get into big arguement here, but you dead wrong on this statement.
Water resistance has everything to do with how fast anything will fall in that water or air for that matter, but in air the difference in smaller.
You can prove this to yourself but taking 2 large split shot weights, leave one round and take a ballpeen hammer to the other one and pound it into a bowl shape 3 times as large as the round one. Both will weigh the same and have the same mass but the round one will drop in the water over twice as fast as the bowl shaped one does. The only difference between them is water resistance. That is the same reason a larger skirt on your jig heads slows the fall and thinning it out will speed up it's rate of fall. Casting a lure with the same mass but of lesser wieght will allways be more difficult then one of the same mass but more weight. Thats why you could cast an oz. of lead 1000 times as far as you could an oz. of feathers, *or a 1 " round lead will cast farther then a 1" *piece of foam.
AS far as my baits go they weigh a little more then a senko does, so the cast like a bullet, but still have a slower rate of fall because of more water resistance.

Quote:
I can also fish Lighter baits ON TOP of vegetation, and keep it there, where a heavier bait will get caught or fall through it. I understand YOUR preference isn't going to be mine, but both application have there time and place.
I do agree thats why I make the same bait as my sinking bait without any salt, and fish them on or just sub-surface. At times it's a killer presentation.
FloridaBassAssassn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-04, 10:02 PM   #14
Slayem9
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to Slayem9
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

A few definitions are in order:
mass - The measure of the quantity of matter that a body or an object contains; a measure of how much material is in an object. The mass of the body is not dependent on gravity and therefore is different from but proportional to its weight.

density - The quantity of something per unit measure, especially per unit length, area, or volume.
The more salt distributed in a plastic, the heavier it is.
Lead is dense, feathers are not due to molecular weight and crowding.

weight - A measure of the heaviness of an object; the gravitational force exerted on an object of a certain mass.

The answer to the question, "does a more massive object accelerate at a greater rate than a less massive object?", is absolutely not! In fact, increasing mass tends to decrease acceleration.

Your statement:
Quote:
Both will weigh the same and have the same mass but the round one will drop in the water over twice as fast as the bowl shaped one does.
Let's not confuse aerodynamics and hydrodynamics with
mass. (hydrodynamics - motion of fluids and the forces acting on solid bodies immersed in fluids and in motion relative to them.) By reshaping the lead, you've increased the mass of one object and changed it's dynamics.

The shape and the space an object occupies is not the issue; it's density is.

Read the definition again concerning density. If you add salt to one of your lures and none to the another of the same shape and size, one will cast further and easier and fall faster in the water column. *Senkos are rounder and heavier than your worms and therefore there is less water flow resistance (hydrodynamics) and greater gravitational pull (more weight.) But being only .2 oz heavier than the Stik-O, it falls faster yet maintains the same duel tip action on the way down.

Your statement:I highly disagree that lighter is better. I slower fall might sometimes work better but you don't have to make the bait lighter to achive that.
Sometimes a slower fall is better and the best way to make a soft bait lighter is by adding nothing to the plastic! The hook is the weight.

Considering that your jerkworms are most times not used with a weight-forward, heavier is definitely better. Given a certain style bait and a desired type of fall, a forward weight (bullet sinker or jighead) pitches the bait downward, in a vertical line. The most recent, popular falls for many soft plastics, is horizontal. This applies to tubes, jerk sticks, lizards and Carolina rigs (a horizontal presentation) and weight of any kind is not desired.

Coincidentally, the worm you pour is an old design that was dropped by Riverside over 10 years ago as an alternative to the Slugo. I still have a dozen and don't care for their action. Tom Mann has a similar design (the Shadow), but with a rear fin. (The 2 3/4" size is superb, the 5" and 6" sizes are so so. If you produce a 2 3/4"-3", *I'll bet yours would be as superb, for my style of fishing.)
The Banjo Minnow is another, but so soft, that it forces you to use up the baits faster. (The kit is a joke!)

*I prefer rounded wide baits versus flat-sided baits that are produced by one part molds. There are a number of flat sided baits that are fine from a one part mold (Zipper Worm, chunk trailers, a few grubs).
That 's not to say that flat sided worms can't catch fish; my first sticks were flat sided and did excellent my first year.

I guess I just like the look of full rounded lures and believe the action on the fall is unique. Here are a few recent creations from 2-part aluminum molds from Bobstackleshack.com



Slayem9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-04, 12:12 AM   #15
BassNva
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to BassNva
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

good posts guys..
sam,hydrodynamics,density ??? ???..made me dizzy,but thanks ;D
BassNva is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-04, 01:21 AM   #16
FloridaBassAssassn
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: University of Florida
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to FloridaBassAssassn
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

Quote:
That 's not to say that they can't catch fish, but their flat design requires the hook to be inserted through the thinnest part, limiting their action. I prefer the action of my pours any day.
You should not condem something you have never tried. If you ever fished one of my baits before you would know that this statement is not true. AS they have a lot more action then any round stick bait and that it why they work so well. I used to fish senko's but I wanted a better bait so I designed mine to have more action then all the other stick baits. I still fish with few guys that are senko fans and I get on average about 3 fish to their 2, but after a while they have converted to Sink-N-Fool's too.
Quote:
The worm you pour is an old design that was dropped by Cotee over 10 years ago and mostly used in saltwater. I still have a dozen and don't care for the action.
My bait is a one of a kind that I designed myself so you do NOT have anything like it. I carved it out of a piece of wood. I made the molds. I'm the only place you can get this bait. *All of my bait are 100% designed by me. I would not sell a knock off of somebody elses baits like most of the guys do.
FloridaBassAssassn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-04, 01:58 AM   #17
spinnerb8
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

boy you can't BUY this kind of advertising.Wait ,he didn't now ,did he ??? ???But thanks for the lesson Sam!
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-04, 08:56 AM   #18
Slayem9
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to Slayem9
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

You mean this original by Riverside, mass produced over 10 years ago?


versus F'n Fools worm:


BassnTom - I knew I still had that physics book somewhere LOL !
Slayem9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-04, 01:50 PM   #19
FatBass
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to FatBass
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

You essentially have the same bait there, only a machine can paint the eyes on the top one. I pour all of my plastic....everything! I make sticks in 6 different sizes that I know are superior to $6.00 a bag Senkos. It is just my preference to use HP's. I like the unqiue colors and salt and scent mixtures I can customize to my, or my customers liking. I like finese fishing and HP's are tailor made for that

The mass produced stuff is ok, I grew up on it and learned many lessons with it.
FatBass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-04, 07:45 PM   #20
FloridaBassAssassn
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: University of Florida
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to FloridaBassAssassn
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

Well which is it Sam! First you said Cotee made them, now you say Riverside made them, that next? oh I know it's a zoom 3X bait. I'm sure there are baits that look similar to almost any bait there is know to man but that doesn't mean it's not original. I make my baits in a 6" an 8" and a 10", I used to make it in a 12" too but found it was just to big. I suppose your going to tell me that Riverside made them too. I fish the 10" ones alot for trophy bass, pike and muskies.
I also have never seen any baits Riverside ever made that had any salt in them. Not that I fish with them as they are cheap walmart junk and hard as a hockey puck for the most part. So to say that because you fished an old Riverside bait you know what it would fish the same as my bait is ridiculous. You say they don't make anymore so it must not have not been a great bait for them.
I'm not interested in getting into a pissing contest here so this will be my last post on this subject. I know how well my salt baits work. And anyone who has tried them know how well they work too. That's why I offered the guarantee that they will catch fish, because they do.
FloridaBassAssassn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-04, 08:27 PM   #21
ploop...BOOM
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to ploop...BOOM
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

Holy crap. I think this one got out of hand. Here's the fact.........
What does it boil down to.........personal preference. If you want to pour your own, pour your own. If you want to pay $2.00 a bag, pay it. If you want to spend $6.00 a bag, it's your game. Salt content/rate of fall/length/diameter/roundness - all factors that play into "personal preference" - so what if it is a knock off of another brand. I like Senkos - sue me. I like 'em - I'm not going to try to get you to buy them. It's a stick bait, I like it. I don't like some of the other brands - who cares.......................................let's fish.
It's going to be a long winter boys if this is how the "off season" is starting.
-Bob
ploop...BOOM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-04, 10:24 PM   #22
Slayem9
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to Slayem9
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

Fool
I went to my basement to post a picture of your copy and noticed the name printed on one side was Riverside. Sorry for the mistake. I changed it in the post that was supposed to enlighten you a little on physics.

Nothing wrong with copies or pouring from a Lurecraft kit of molds. Hey if they work, they work. If the baits are that good and better than Senkos, Tiki Sticks, Assalt Sticks and many other fine salted lures, then you are sitting on a gold mine and making many a bass angler very happy! That's half the reason I pour my own - to hear that someone had the same success I did.

There are a million lures on the market, some work, some don't. But when someone can produce a lure that becomes a standard or classic (like the salted stick), everyone benefits and the variety we all enjoy, is just that much more.

(The Riverside bait is very supple and soft and much more so than the Slugo, which still catches fish. I will try it again this coming year to see if I might have rushed judgement.)

Sam
Slayem9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-04, 10:30 PM   #23
gallenl
BassFishin.Com Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location:
Posts: 0
Send a message via ICQ to gallenl
Default Re: Are handpoured baits always superior?

Hey spinnerb8,don't give up on them.they have there place and time. Well,here is my 2 cents.I have bought more senko type baits than all 5 of my fishing buddies combined.I went to a bass-a-rama and spent 150 bucks on them alone....Then i spent the next spring and summer fishing them......The only real advise i can give is fish them wacky,with a weedless hook...Also use more natural colors for more consistant stricks.But,sometimes a wild color will get 'em freakin out.........BPS stick o's have been the best in the value to action ratio...........
gallenl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Disclosure / Disclaimer
Before acting on the content posted, you should know that BassFishin.Com may benefit financially and otherwise from content, advertising, links or otherwise from anything you click on, read, or look at on our website. Click here to read our Disclosure Policy and Disclaimer.


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2013 BassFishin.Com LLC